ImageEver since Marketcircle released their new version of Daylite and debuted Daylite Touch, we’ve had a lot of interest from folks looking to run it from our data center. The obvious draw of this is so the iPhone can reach the database anytime, from anywhere. The secondary benefits are a safe, remote location and the ability to use the Mac mini for other reason like hosting a web site or file sharing.

In this latest version of Daylite, Marketcircle offers two different applications for the client and the server. Daylite Server is now a separate install that makes it real easy to share your database for multiple users and multiple locations.

Today, I put together a quick video tutorial that walks thru the install and configuration process of Daylite Server. I setup a Mac mini in our data center, connected to it from my home office, and walked thru the whole process. It’s the exact same steps a new Macminicolo customer would use to get up and going right away.

So now, to go along with our ten reason to host Daylite with Macminicolo, here is a video showing how to install Daylite Server on a Remote Mac mini.

ImageYesterday during the presentation of the new iPhone 3.0 SDK, Apple announced that developers will finally get to use the announced Push Notification service. This will allow iPhone apps to receive messages even while they are not running.

We are members of the iPhone Developer Program because we think the hosted Mac minis make a really great back end for these iPhone applications. Since the cost is so low and our install time is quick, developers can grow along with their application. We like to keep an eye on the technologies and read through the documents available in the program.

However, we are not currently developing any applications. We’re focusing on helping other developers get their project going.

So here is what we’re looking for right now. We’d like to work with a couple developers who are planning to use the push notification system in their applications. We’ll put you on some Mac minis here in the data center and host the machine for a year at no cost. We’ll give you as much bandwidth as you need. In return, we’d like to keep in good contact with you through the development process and have you inform us on what kind of performance you’re getting for the Push Notification system. From what we’ve seen from our internal testing, these Mac minis will be able to keep up with even the most popular applications. Now we’d like to see some real world numbers on real world apps.

If you’d like to work with us, feel free to send me a note. We’re going to choose two or three applications that look like they’ll provide good performance benchmarks on the Push Notifications. It’s open to both new and existing applications. We’ll agree to NDA on the application ideas, we’re just interested in the performance numbers.

Update: Thanks for all the interest. I think we’ve found the devs we are going to work for on the benchmarking. However, we’d still love to be considered for any other devs that want to host with us.

ImageFor those of you who read the last post about iStat and were disappointed to find that it wasn’t available at the time, you’re in luck! Just last night, the Apple gatekeepers approved and listed iStat on the App Store. It’s a beautiful app for the iPhone.

For more on the app, see the official page at Bjango.com. Or, just head straight to iTunes to buy the iStat app. (iTunes link)

ImageiStat Menus and iStat Pro is very popular Mac software to watch the inner workings of your Mac. These applications keep an eye on things like CPU and RAM usage.

Just recently, the same company that develops these apps has announced iStat for the iPhone. It’s an incredibly good looking app that will let you watch the resources on your Mac. It includes views of RAM, CPU, network, uptime, temps, etc. It also offers great implementations of pinging and traceroutes to servers. Incredibly useful if you are running a remote Mac server.

This app will also let you take a look of the stats of your iPhone like memory usage, disk space, etc.

This app has been submitted to Apple for review and should be on the App Store soon.

And it gets even better for Macminicolo customers. In an exclusive deal with Bjango, all Macminicolo customers can receive free copies of the application. See here for more details and screenshots.

ImageIf you have a moment, I’d love for any readers to take a quick poll on iPhone/iPod Touch security practices. The only pre-requisite is that you own one or the other. It’s just 7 short questions.

To perform the poll, I took advantage of the great Google Docs. You won’t need to sign in or leave any personal data.

The poll can be found here

Thanks for your time.
Update: We had a good number of responses come thru and have no shutdown the poll. Thanks for taking the time.

ImageIf you’re reading this blog, you probably have a Mac server setup somewhere that requires your attention occasionally. For those of you with an iPhone, I hope to help you out.

Over on the Macminicolo.net site, I’ve put together a list of seven iPhone applications that I use every day to work with the Mac servers and IT work in general. You can read it here.

ImageThe whole reason I had a jailbroken iPhone was to run VNSea. This let me control all of the Macs in our data center.

But when iPhone version 2.0 came out, I updated despite losing the VNSea client.

So you can imagine how happy I was to see VNC Mocha lite. It is a very well done VNC client that let’s you store multiple connections to control both Macs and PCs. It has a real nice interface that let’s you scroll around the remote screen, use a mouse cursor, and pop up a QWERTY keyboard for use. Just set up your Mac server for Screen Sharing and off you go.

And it is also free. (They’ll be releasing a $5.99 version later that has a few more options.)

To learn more about the app, visit here. Or you can drop straight to the iTunes App Store to download it here. (iTunes Link)